Grace:  Simple elegance or refinement of movement.

 

When the Denver Broncos and the Seattle Seahawks meet on the field at Super Bowl XLVIII, they will feature completely different types of WRs.  

 

The Broncos heralded squad are the gold standard in terms of size, speed and productivity. The Seahawks, meanwhile, feature a lesser known yet surprisingly productive receiving corps. 

 

Denver's receiving roster reads like a fantasy football line-up.  Demaryius Thomas (1,430, 14TDs), Eric Decker (1,288 yards, 11TDs) and Wes Welker(778 yards, 10TDs) present a formidable challenge, even for the top rated Seahawks defense.  The Broncos big three receiver combined to catch 252 passes this year.  That’s 116 more then Seattle’s top three WRs.

 

What Seattle's receivers lack in numbers, they more than make up in heart and determination. Doug Baldwin and Jermaine Kearse were undrafted free agents, and Golden Tate was a second round draft pick.   Don't let their lack of star power fool you, though.  When you analyze the numbers, the Seahawks were more efficient than Denver on a target basis and on creating plays of 20 or more yards.  If you fall asleep on Seattle receivers, you will get burned.

 

Super Bowl Facts – Wide Receivers

 

Jerry Rice holds the Super Bowl single-game record for most receiving yards with 215.

 

Four players hold the Super Bowl single-game record for most receptions.

(Deion Branch, Jerry Rice, Dan Ross and Wes Welker).

 

There have been seven WRs to win the MVP trophy in a Super Bowl.  They are Lynn Swann, Fred Biletnikoff, Jerry Rice, Desmond Howard, Deion Branch, Hines Ward and Santonio Holmes.

 

The longest reception in Super Bowl history is 85 yards by Carolina Panthers WR  Muhsin Muhammad, on a pass from Jake Delhomme during Super Bowl XXXVIII.

  

Watch Super Bowl XLVIII at 6:30pm ET on Sunday, February 2nd on Fox.

 

Which teams receivers will make the bigger impact in Super Bowl XLVIII?